30,000+ Courses Sold In Just 18 Months (and With a Small Audience!) with Lucy Griffiths (Transcript)

Wait, what?!

She sold Thirty THOUSAND courses??

That, my friend, is a LOT of courses.

Naturally, I DMed Lucy straight-away to ask her to come on the podcast and tell us her strategy. 

(I may or may not have been super curious to know myself. 😁)

The story gets even better, though, because once we got on the phone, I learned that not only had she sold 30,000 courses… she’d done it in just 18 months. 

This is a transcript of Work Less, Earn More, Episode 42. Listen to the episode here.

Lucy Griffiths:

Basically the same formula exists, whether you’re selling courses about mindfulness or whether you’re selling courses about parenting or about camera confidence. It’s the same thing that you sell a small ticket course, low cost course, and then that enables you to sell at scale.

Gillian Perkins:

We became entrepreneurs because more than anything, we want freedom. We want to be in control of our own schedule, income, and life. But unfortunately that isn’t always the reality of being a business owner. I’m Gillian Perkins, and I’m on a mission to take back entrepreneurship for what it’s supposed to be. In every episode, I’ll share with you how to get the most out of every hour you work so that you can work less and earn more. Let’s get to work.

Gillian Perkins:

Hey, there. Welcome back to the show. Today, I am talking to my friend, Lucy Griffiths, who is the creator of the Confident on Cameras courses. This was a fantastic interview with Lucy. I originally reached out to her because I heard that she had sold over 30,000 copies of her courses. I was so impressed by this and I wanted to find out how she did it. So that’s exactly what we get into in this interview, but it was really cool because it tied into something I’m working on in my business right now, and it also tied into the guest expert we have inside a Startup Society right now.

Gillian Perkins:

I talked more about this in the interview, but basically the exact type of funnel that Lucy describes that she used to sell all these courses is the type of funnel that right now we’re teaching the Startup Society members, how to build. Like I said we get more into that into the interview, so let’s get on into it. Here’s Lucy.

Gillian Perkins:

Hey there, Lucy and welcome to the show.

Lucy Griffiths:

Thank you so much for having me. It’s a pleasure to be here. It’s really lovely to see you.

What prompted me to reach out to Lucy?

Gillian Perkins:

Yeah, it’s so good to see you too. It’s been a little while. I want to start out by explaining what prompted me to reach out to you to be on the show today. Basically a few weeks ago, I cleaned out who I was following on Instagram. I unfollowed a whole bunch of people just because I wanted to declutter and get down to the people who I love the very most, and you made the cut. I think I hadn’t been seeing your posts for a little while because I was following a lot of people, but once I cleaned things out, then your posts started popping up in my feed again. And I was like, “Oh, there’s Lucy. Nice to see her.”

Gillian Perkins:

I tapped over to your profile to see what you were up to and I saw that you had added to your bio, that you had sold 30,000 copies of your course. I was really impressed by that and I immediately just thought, “I want to reach out to Lucy and hear this story, find out how you sold so many copies of your course.” Well, for a lot of reasons, but one of the reasons is because I know you don’t actually have a huge audience yourself and that is a very impressive number of courses to have sold. So first of all, just congratulations.

Lucy Griffiths:

Thank you. Thank you.

Gillian Perkins:

I really would just love to have you start by kind of telling the story, but you could maybe start by giving us a little bit of context. Tell us what your course is and a little bit maybe about your audience and what you do, and then tell us just how this happened.

A bit about Lucy

Lucy Griffiths:

Sure. So essentially I created a course about four years ago and it was a course about being camera confident and using video. And I probably sold about 25 and it just sort of sat on the shelf, getting dusty. I was really looking for a way to try and sell that more and take myself out of the process. As many service-based businesses are doing, I was doing a lot of work where I was just doing a lot of one-on-one work with people and I was doing a lot of video production for other people, and it was really full-on. And trying to juggle that with family life was just impossible. And I was getting to the point of burnout.

Lucy Griffiths:

I revisited my course and I broke it down into a micro course, which was called Confident on Camera and then next stage, which I called Go Live and Thrive. And then I built a bigger signature course. And from that, I basically started selling, using both my YouTube channel and also Facebook ads. How I was doing it was selling a low ticket offering. Say $27 for my course and using Facebook ads to sell it.

Lucy Griffiths:

In the process of doing that, the cost of sale is covered by the Facebook ads cost and gives you some profits. So then you can scale that and spend more money each day. I’m spending a chunk of change every day on Facebook ads, but I’m also making a chunk of change every day. Then that allows me to reinvest in Facebook ads and spend a little more money and also then keep profit for myself. Essentially over the course of 18 months now, I’ve sold 30,000 courses. It’s enabled me basically to stop doing one-to-one in the way that I was doing before and just pick and choose what I do.

Lucy Griffiths:

And in the process, I have then been invited, asked to collaborate on other projects. This year, probably not the best year to be doing it with Coronavirus. I was approached, first of all, at the end of last year by a mommy blogger to set up a series of courses, the same way that I’m doing it. We did a joint venture to create a series of parenting tips and confidence in motherhood.

Lucy Griffiths:

We created a series of courses and then I was also approached by a magazine called Psychologist Magazine, which is a really big brand in the UK. It’s kind of a glossy magazine. They also wanted me from a spare bedroom to collaborate with them and do a joint venture. It was basically me and my husband helped me do numbers because I’m rubbish at them.

Lucy Griffiths:

We were sort of sitting there having these meetings with the publisher, the MD of this company that owns a hundred magazines. Anyway, fast forward months through coronavirus and everything else, we have launched a series of courses and we’ve only been launched just two months now and we’re already in double digits of how many courses we were selling. Selling thousands of courses with psychologists as well.

Lucy Griffiths:

It’s been a full on year with creating all these different courses, but basically the same formula exists, whether you’re selling courses about mindfulness or whether you’re selling courses about parenting or about camera confidence. It’s the same thing that you sell a small ticket course, low cost course, and then that enables you to sell at scale.

Using Facebook Ad’s to sell 

Gillian Perkins:

So cool. And what an amazing story. And I didn’t know any of the story before this interview. So something really interesting about this to me is how it ties into something that we’re doing inside Startup Society right now. Right now, we actually have a guest expert in the program who is a Facebook ad strategist. His name is Tony Rulli. And that is exactly what he’s working with the members on is building out a tripwire funnel, which is really what you were describing, and I’m sure you know, and just creating these Facebook ad campaigns that are selling this low cost offer, that then covers the cost of the campaigns.

Gillian Perkins:

And what is so neat about that is that you’re growing your list in the process. And not just a list of people but a list of customers who have bought from you, who are the warmest of the warm leads. Right?

Lucy Griffiths:

Absolutely. Because they’ve actually spent money with you, it’s not like in the old days of Facebook ads where you were doing a freebie and hoping somebody would sign up to your list and then they’d be on your list and they join your Facebook group and then you’d attempt to sell to them. With that strategy, often you’ve got a lot of freebie hunters and then they joined your Facebook group. And then I’m a terrible salesperson. It’s not my thing. I’m not very good at that.

Gillian Perkins:

You can’t keep saying that at this point, right? You lost my claim to fame.

Lucy Griffiths:

But the beauty of this is, I can write a script and I can record a video that’s a script that sells. And then that does the selling for me and it just sells on repeat. It means that it takes me out of the process and otherwise if I were having a discovery call with somebody, I’d be waffling around the subject, I’d be avoiding it. Any kind of talk about money, I just would completely go off on tangents and end up saying, “Oh yes, okay,” and offer the work for free or just basically half the cost of my prices or all kinds of things. My husband would just be despairing of me. This way just avoided all of that. And it just meant that I sold on repeat.

Gillian Perkins:

I think a lot of entrepreneurs can relate to that. Entrepreneurs who are having to sell their own products. They weren’t taught how to be salespeople. And I know I’ve been there too, getting on a sales call and then just agreeing to all sorts of things that you didn’t mean to agree to, and not being the professional that you wanted to be. There’s all sorts of problems to run into. I really appreciate what you’re saying about basically being strategic and intentional about your selling process ahead of time and pre-recording things so that you take yourself out of the process, but you’re still in the process. It’s more like you’re taking your emotion out of the process, right? You’re taking the stressful situation out of the process.

Lucy Griffiths:

Yes, absolutely. It just completely removed all the stress I could cope with doing a sales script. That basically enabled me to scale and sell at scale, and in the process as you said, grow my list and do all those things that we want to do. But sometimes in the beginning, we can feel like we’re just sort of treading water and it’s not really happening. That’s how everything has changed really in that way.

Setting up your Facebook Ad’s for optimal cart value 

Gillian Perkins:

I have some nerdy questions for you about the Facebook ads themselves and your strategy there. The first one, I think is when you’re running these Facebook ads to sell your low cost course, did you run them so that they were optimized to sell the course specifically or were you optimizing them for leads? And when people clicked on the ad, were they taken directly to a sales page for the course, or were they taken to a free opt-in page and then the course was offered for sale on the thank you page?

Lucy Griffiths:

They were specific ads to sell the low ticket course, and it went to a sales page selling the course. It’s all about the course, people buy that. And then there’s an order bump. Order bump is $37 and then from there, they then are sold into a bigger ticket course for 297. 

Gillian Perkins:

And you say from there, they’re sold into the more expensive course. Do you mean right after they purchase that $27 product after they get to essentially the thank you page for buying that they are offered a more expensive product?

Lucy Griffiths:

They’re then offered a more expensive product. And then if they say, “No, thank you to that,” then they’re offered a cheaper product. And then on the back of that, they’re then offered another product. Basically, they go through a series of five different products straight away.

Gillian Perkins:

I’ve heard that that can really help to increase your average cart value. Have you found that to be the case?

Lucy Griffiths:

And that is what it’s all about, making sure that your average order value is as optimal as possible because you want the frontend of the funnel to be successful, but you also want to make sure that the backend is also successful. And certainly now, I’ve seen it both with my own business, but also with these joint ventures. You want to make sure that everything is in symmetry so that all the courses are interrelated and connected. So mine, they’re all really, really interconnected and so I have a great average order value, whereas say some of the other joint ventures, they do really well on the front end and they don’t sell so many on the backend.

Lucy Griffiths:

But as long as you’re charging the right price point for the front end, it doesn’t matter so much. But obviously you do want them to be buying. If you have one or two people a day spending 297, then that really helps boost your average sales for the week. And that’s what you’re looking for really.

Gillian Perkins:

With that first product that they’re faced with that $27 product, my question here is, do you know if you are just breaking even on your Facebook ad cost with that one product or if you are positive with that product?

Lucy Griffiths:

We are always positive with that product. I have to say that I’m not great with numbers. My husband tracks this at great detail. We’re always in a really strong position. Let’s say August, it’s a more challenging month, we sort just scrape over that line. But the rest of the year, we are making double the order value print on average, basically.

Gillian Perkins:

Okay, great. So then obviously having those additional offers that are subsequently offered to these new customers is going to be increasing that significantly.

Lucy Griffiths:

Yes. And that’s what is adding into the bottom line and ensuring that we can also scale our Facebook ads and test out new markets.

What does it mean to have symmetry with your offers?

Gillian Perkins:

Going back to something you said a couple of minutes ago, you said it was really important to have symmetry with your offers. So what do you mean there? Is it basically that you need your offers to be congruent and logically lead one to the next?

Lucy Griffiths:

Yes, absolutely.

Gillian Perkins:

Can you give me an example of how your different programs work together in this way?

Lucy Griffiths:

Okay. For my courses, it’s Camera Confident, from that, it goes into Go Live and Thrive. Essentially it’s, “Oh, how to get confident on camera, course number one, and then how to actually switch on and go live on Facebook, course number two. And then course number three is how to use YouTube. There’s a flow to it. And then course number four is how to sell on camera. Again, everything goes into each other and it’s streamlined.

Lucy Griffiths:

For psychologists, I was creating the courses with the editor-in-chief of psychologists and my business. She’s also my business partner, Susie Walker. We were doing four courses. We did two courses each. Susie’s course one is called Create the Life You Want, which is a fantastic course. It’s just brilliant. I can’t rave about it enough. It’s so good. That’s course one. And then course two is my course, which is imposter syndrome.

Lucy Griffiths:

Although it’s a fine course, it doesn’t quite click in that way so we’re going to change that to something that there is a much more symmetry with it that it just flows. We’re looking to change that within the months so that then it’s just a no brainer for people to tick that box and get the order bump.

Gillian Perkins:

I love that. Just making it a no brainer for them, because it sounds to me like those two different courses, probably you would have a lot of people who both courses would appeal to the same sort of person. But the buying decision is going to be motivated by two different problems that people might be struggling with and the desire that people have, they would be buying the course to satisfy or to fulfill is going to be different for both of those. While there would be a lot of crossover like in our Venn diagram of the two kinds of people who might buy this course, there will be crossover. There’ll be a lot of people in the middle of that Venn diagram, but it is two different circles of people. And so you’ll be losing a lot of customers who won’t be interested in the second course.

Lucy Griffiths:

Yes. And that’s exactly it. I hadn’t really appreciated that until we were sort of going through it. And then now we’ve been selling for eight weeks that I now realize like, “Okay, we can switch this up.” We’re going to do something that’s really closely related, basically create the life you want and then how to stay on track once you’ve created the life you want which again, there’s a flow, there’s a symmetry.

Gillian Perkins:

Yeah. That sounds like a much more logical flow. I think a lot of people think, okay, I could do X, Y, and Z and create the life I want, but how do I stay consistent with it? How do I keep that up? How do I maintain the habits that contribute to this life I love.

Lucy Griffiths:

That’s exactly it. It’s always thinking, what’s the add-on, what’s the extra thing that you can offer people. And you could do that in a variety of ways, whether you’ve got course one and then it’s a digital product to go with it, a planner or something that is just a no brainer. It’s something that will go with course one because I get about 40% of people buying my course too. So it is possible to get a really good rate of order bump. The more that you can make it, there’s that symmetry, the more successful your funnel will be.

Gillian Perkins:

Yeah. 40% is an amazing rate, and I think that’s just a Testament of what you were talking about there that it’s so important for that offer to logically follow for there to be that symmetry.

Lucy Griffiths:

Absolutely, because you’re paying for that customer, so you want to absolutely maximize that customer and the way you can do that is by having this order bump.

Run Facebook Ad’s yourself or outsource?

Gillian Perkins:

Perfect. Okay. So now I have a few questions for you about the Facebook ads themself. The first one is, do you run the ads yourself or did you outsource that?

Lucy Griffiths:

I outsource that. I started off doing Facebook ads myself, and I think in the beginning you can test it and see, but in general, I now work with someone who is one of, basically eight in the world who were accredited by Facebook. If there’s a problem with anything, she has all these connections to open doors. And it just meant when I was scaling, it was much easier to do that. I’m not a numbers person, so it was much better to outsource that.

Gillian Perkins:

Did you primarily outsource it so that you could just have someone who knew what they were doing and like really manage it for you? I guess I’m wondering, was it more about the technical or was it more about the creative, the ad copy and the images and things like that?

Lucy Griffiths:

It’s more about the technical. It was more about absolutely understanding the best way to leverage Facebook ads and get the best return on investment. When it comes to the copy, I do work on that, but I also actually outsource copywriting, particularly sales pages.

Lucy Griffiths:

Sales pages and ads, I think it’s really a worthwhile investment to get someone who’s really good. I’ve now explored quite a few copywriters, and I can honestly say that it’s such a skill and there are lots of copywriters who can claim to be really good and can charge huge amounts of money and then really not that great. You have to shop around for someone who knows what they’re doing and it definitely comes recommended for doing Facebook ads.

Gillian Perkins:

Taking a note. It sounds like it’s definitely not primarily who’s writing the ads and it’s also not your Facebook ad manager who’s writing the ads?

Lucy Griffiths:

No. I have someone who does the copy and then my Facebook ads. My Facebook ads person just manages my Facebook ads. But she will also oversee the copy. She has a good understanding and will tweak things as well.

Gillian Perkins:

You were initially writing your Facebook ads. How long ago did you outsource the writing of the ads?

Lucy Griffiths:

I outsourced before I started selling courses. I did Facebook ads maybe four years ago when I first started in business. Just the usual route where it was a freebie, Facebook ads and a freebie. I was having terrible return on investment and just ads, it was all glitchy and it didn’t really work. That whole method of trying to get people to sign up to your list from a freebie and I soon stopped. I realized it was just not a profitable way to run a business.

Gillian Perkins:

Are these video ads or image ads that you’re running primarily?

Lucy Griffiths:

So bizarrely, and I’m often asked this question like, “Why have you got a still image of you when you’re selling video?” Video ads work really well for retargeting people. People will watch those and you can understand who your audience is, and we target those people.

Gillian Perkins:

I think that really makes sense actually, because I mean, think about it. If you’re scrolling your feed and you see a video from someone you don’t know who they are, you don’t know why you’d want to listen to them. You’re not going to stop and listen to this random person talking, but if you’re retargeting, then you’re showing these ads to people who have already been introduced to you and your brand at least a little bit. And so now they have a little bit of context and they know why they might want to listen to you.

Lucy Griffiths:

And that’s it. The first thing is you want to stop the scroll and actually bizarrely, when people are making a purchasing decision, they’re more likely to purchase from you when it’s a still image, rather than a video. I can’t explain why, but in the case of selling courses, that’s what we found.

Gillian Perkins:

That is really interesting and that can save a lot of people, a bit of testing work right there to not have it. I do think it is still, of course, always good to test things out for yourself and you never know what might work, but you’ve run a lot of ads at this point and consulted a lot of courses, so it’s great to have your experience on that.

Lucy Griffiths:

Yeah. You definitely have to test. I do have videos and I run videos. And the great thing with using video is that if somebody watches your video for more than 10 seconds, they’re interested in you and therefore it’s worth re-targeting them with more ads and really going after that audience. If they don’t watch, you can skip on by and not retarget them.

Is it worth re-targeting?

Gillian Perkins:

Well, that leads right into what my next question was, which is, if someone doesn’t buy after clicking on your ad, are you retargeting them? It sounds like definitely, yes. Are you retargeting them with the same ad though or a different ad? It’s a video ad now.

Lucy Griffiths:

A mix of still and video ads, because actually the purchasing decision is often about a still image. And people need to see things. I think it’s nine times before they’ll actually buy. You have to warm them up, so they get to know you. And obviously, as you said at the beginning of this, I’m not a big influencer. I’m not with a big presence, but people do see my ads and somehow take notice.

Gillian Perkins:

Another question that I have about the ads is for those video ads are you writing the script for the ads yourself or is your copywriter writing you a script that you’re reading on a video?

Lucy Griffiths:

I write the video scripts. So I have a formula for those. I have a course that teaches people how to do it, and I attend to stick to that script where it’s got various pain points and stats that I drop in, and then the way that I close. And though it’s kind of fairly formulaic, people haven’t noticed yet.

Gillian Perkins:

Or if they noticed, it worked anyway, right?

Lucy Griffiths:

Yes.

All about the email funnel

Gillian Perkins:

Okay. So now that we’ve talked about the ads, a fair amount, I know we’re kind of running out of time, but I want to talk to you about the other thing that seems to be like, it’s probably a big part of this equation, which is the emails. Once someone purchases one of your products, you’re probably sending them a series of emails. Could you walk me through what that looks like?

Lucy Griffiths:

Yes, absolutely. Essentially they join the list. They have purchased at least one course, and then they’re sent a series of emails to nurture them to get to know me.

Gillian Perkins:

Roughly how many emails that are just nurturing?

Lucy Griffiths:

What I do is I send the welcome email and then I send three that are just so they get to know me. And what I want them to do is actually do the course because how often have we bought courses and products? I’m so guilty of this.

Gillian Perkins:

I raise my hand.

Lucy Griffiths:

You don’t actually take action and do it. What I want them to do is do all of those things, because actually it’s crammed full of useful information that’s going to really help them. But once they do the course, they’ll get to know me. They’ll see, actually, that it’s quite a good course. And then they might want to buy other courses. It’s really important that they do course one. And so I want to really encourage them to do that as much as possible. Giving them information about it, cheerleading them, all of that stuff.

Lucy Griffiths:

Then we leave it for two weeks, I think it is. And then there’s a series of emails about buying an order bump, and then it’s a space of a couple of weeks and then it’s for the bigger course. And then it’s my membership. I then also have a series of other courses that I sell. I have a Pinterest course. What I’m doing with that is I have a quiz and just to test to see if somebody is interested in a particular product. We do a quiz and then on the back of the quiz, there’s a tripwire to sell the course.

Gillian Perkins:

Oh, okay. Is the tripwire that’s offered on the backend of the course based on the results that they got in the course?

Lucy Griffiths:

Yes.

Gillian Perkins:

Ooh, very smart. I like that a lot.

Lucy Griffiths:

Essentially I have four different quizzes and so some are selling. So different outcomes selling a different course. And then also the quizzes are then really great to put on social media, on YouTube to therefore also get people to sign up and have a go at the quiz. And then from that, then ultimately buy from the products as well.

Gillian Perkins:

The reason those quizzes are so smart is because you’re basically asking people, what do you want me to sell to you? And then you’re selling it to them.

Lucy Griffiths:

Yes. I’ve got a variety of quizzes on  what type of video, what’s your video personality, that kind of thing. So it really taps into where they are and their journey to then sell it and aim for that particular target.

Gillian Perkins:

Okay. You mentioned that you sometimes share those quizzes on social media. Do you ever promote them with Facebook ads or just organic social media for those?

Lucy Griffiths:

At the moment, it’s just organic social media, but I am tempted to do the quizzes. I think I’m going to wait. One thing to know with selling on Facebook. That quarter four is always the most challenging because it’s the run-up to Christmas, and basically Facebook ads literally, it’s a big auction. And so you are competing with lots of the big global brands. So the cost of a Facebook ad, you don’t get as much return on investment. If you wait until the 26th of December, then the cost increases massively.

Lucy Griffiths:

If you’re testing out new products, things like that, I would say, wait until after Christmas. And particularly things like quizzes, you’re going to get a much better return on your investment.

Gillian Perkins:

That is a great tip. Okay. So those quizzes relate to another question that I have for you, which is when you’re first describing the Facebook ads, I understood that basically people were only getting on your list if they had bought something, which is so beautiful to just have a list full of buyers, the warmest of the warm leads. But if you’re putting those quizzes out there, then you must have some people who are joining your list having not bought. Is that correct?

Lucy Griffiths:

Yes.

Gillian Perkins:

Do you not have very many people at all doing that?

Lucy Griffiths:

I do have some people on my list from my freebies. There was a time when I actually removed all freebies and they could own it. The only way they could join my list was literally through buying a product.

Gillian Perkins:

And it runs so counter to what so many people teach, but it’s a really cool different strategy.

Lucy Griffiths:

Yeah. I did actually like it. When I started doing the quizzes and thinking about the quizzes and actually harnessing things like Pinterest, I got a lot of use on Pinterest. I was then thinking, “Okay. I need to actually bring them back in, but I wanted to do it in a smarter way.” Hence, things like the quizzes and really be as streamlined as possible with both freebies as well that it was bound straight into selling a course, rather than the four.

Lucy Griffiths:

It’s actually quite a good course that it was like a little free mini course, but it wasn’t going anywhere and it wasn’t streamlined. Everything that you do has to be so intentional. The freebie, the quiz has to match your courses. You do the mini course and then the bigger courses so that can then enable you to scale and sell more successfully.

Gillian Perkins:

That is gold right there and something that so many people miss when they are working on building an online business.

Lucy Griffiths:

Absolutely. I mean, I just sort of like, “Oh, yes. Let’s create either the get visible guide.” And it’s fine. But it didn’t go anywhere.

Gillian Perkins:

Can you walk us through what sorts of emails people get after they subscribe to your list via one of these quizzes, but they haven’t bought yet? You’re not introducing them to the product that they just purchased. I assume that you have them go through a series of welcome emails and then it probably looks kind of similar after that?

Lucy Griffiths:

Yes. Essentially if they don’t buy, then gradually they’ll get three emails selling a product. But essentially what I’ve tried to set up is I’ve got six months worth of emails to send to somebody selling different products and courses. Once they join my list, then literally in that nurture sequence for six months.

Gillian Perkins:

Is it an email every week for six months or is it like a few emails and then take a break and then a few emails and then take a break?

Lucy Griffiths:

It’s three emails, take a break for a couple of weeks, three emails, take a break for a couple of weeks.

Gillian Perkins:

Wow, Lucy. You have shared so much with us today. This has been so interesting and while I would love to continue to ask you all the nitty-gritty questions about every single aspect of this amazing funnel that you built, I feel like the best way for people to actually understand all the details and see this would be to see it in action, right? Where can people go to find you online, maybe subscribe to your newsletter, maybe take one of your quizzes, where can people find you?

Connect with Lucy

Lucy Griffiths:

If you go to lucygriffiths.com, my quizzes are there and also my course, Confident on Camera, so you can see the process in action.

Gillian Perkins:

Yeah, that would be great. Seeing things in action is often much better than just hearing a description of them. Is there anywhere else where people can find you online?

Lucy Griffiths:

I tend to be lucygriffithsdotcom, D-O-T-C-O-M on YouTube on Instagram. And I’d love to connect with you there.

Gillian Perkins:

Okay, fantastic. Well, we’ll be sure to leave links to all those different sites in the show notes so people can find you and just thank you again so much for sharing so generously with us today.

Lucy Griffiths:

Oh, thank you for having me.

Gillian Perkins:

Wasn’t that a great interview? I loved talking to Lucy today. I really wasn’t nerding out about all the details she was sharing about how this funnel works and she just has such an amazing story. It’s amazing how far she’s come in just the last 18 months. I don’t know if you caught that, but she’s sold at least 30,000 plus courses in just the last 18 months. And for six of those months, she wasn’t even working because of all the craziness that has been 2020. A truly impressive accomplishment here and something that I hope you can learn a lot from so that you can build a funnel and an entire system like this in your business and start selling courses on autopilot as well.

Startup Society

Gillian Perkins:

Speaking of which, as I mentioned earlier on, this exact type of funnel is exactly what we are currently teaching inside Startup Society. We have our guest expert, Tony Rulli in there who is an incredible Facebook ads manager. He runs the company that runs the Facebook ads for convert kit, acuity scheduling, Brooke Castillo, Jasmine Star, and myself. And he’s inside Startup Society right now as our guest expert, teaching us how to build a funnel like this and to run the Facebook ads into the funnel.

Gillian Perkins:

If you want to learn how to do this for yourself, then make sure you head to startupsociety.com to find out more and join the program. We can’t wait to meet you and start working together to grow your business month after month.

Connect with me

Gillian Perkins:

Thanks so much for listening to this episode of Work Less, Earn More. Now here’s what I want you to do next. Take a screenshot of the episode you’re listening to right now and share it on Instagram stories. And when you do, make sure you tag me @gillianzperkins so I can see that you’re listening. Sharing on stories is going to help more people find this podcast so that they too can learn how to work less, earn more and take back their lives.

Gillian Perkins:

And if you really love the show, then head over to Apple Podcasts and leave a review to give it a boost. Not only will this help the show out, but it’s also going to give you the chance to win a 12-month membership to Startup Society. Each week, I’ll be picking one winner. To enter, all you need to do is post a review on Apple Podcasts and be sure to include your Instagram handle so we can send you a DM if you win.

Gillian Perkins:

Okay. Now let’s wrap this up. I’m Gillian Perkins, and until next week, stay focused and take action.

    Sean McMullin

    Click Here to Leave a Comment Below

    Leave a Comment: